Religions of the World (13e) : 9780133793826

Religions of the World (13e)

Hopfe & Hendrickson
 
Edition
 
13
ISBN
 
9780133793826
ISBN 10
 
0133793826
Published
 
31/12/2014
Published by
 
Pearson Higher Ed USA
Pages
 
312
Format
 
Out of stock
 
Title type
Book
$153.99
 
 
Title type
 
$60.00
 
 
Description
For courses in World Religions


The histories, deep-seated beliefs, and ethical systems that make up the world’s religions are some of the most important forces at play on our incredibly diverse planet. Religions of the World, 13th Edition guides students as they explore each of the world’s major faiths, imparting the knowledge they need to better understand today’s world. By explaining religious diversity and complex themes within a historical context, Religions of the World helps students relate to cultures very different from their own.

Table of contents
  • Introduction and Overview
  • PART I: RELIGIONS ORIGINATING IN THE AMERICAS AND AFRICA
  • 1. The Study of Religions
  • 2. Native American Religions
  • 3. African Religions
  • PART II: RELIGIONS ORIGINATING IN INDIA
  • 4. Hinduism
  • 5. Jainism
  • 6. Buddhism
  • 7. Sikhism
  • PART III: RELIGIONS ORIGINATING IN CHINA AND JAPAN
  • 8. Chinese Religions
  • 9. Shinto
  • PART IV: RELIGIONS ORIGINATING IN THE MIDDLE EAST
  • 10. Judaism
  • 11. Christianity
  • 12. Islam
  • 13. Baha’i
New to this edition
Religions of the World, Thirteenth Edition is also available via REVEL™, an immersive learning experience designed for the way today's students read, think, and learn. Learn more.


A comprehensive, relatable overview of world religions
The revised first section of the book has been refocused on living religions in the Americas and Africa.

The account of the origins of Hinduism in Chapter 4 has been updated to reflect more recent scholarship.

Chapter 13 on Baha’i, previously available online only, is now included in the main text.

In-text features that foster deep understanding
Religion and Public Life boxes throughout the text invite reflection on religion’s role in contemporary political and social issues.

An outstanding framework for learning
Reconceived and expanded learning architecture throughout the text coordinates the main headings in the running text with both the learning objectives listed at the beginning of each chapter and the Think About It questions listed at the end of each chapter. This improved structure helps students understand what is expected of them in the course, and keeps them on task while they read.

Expanded lists of key terms at the beginning of each chapter better help students master the vocabulary of world religions.
Features & benefits
  • Well-rounded coverage of each of the world’s major religions ensures that students receive a thorough overview of the key faiths around the globe. For example, the chapter on Native American religion includes a discussion of Christianity among Native Americans, and the chapter on African religion includes discussions of Christianity and Islam in sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Religions of the World explains complex themes within a historical context, which helps students relate to what they’re learning. The authors explore living religions in terms of the historical and cultural factors that produced them: the lives of their founders, their basic teachings, their historical development, and current status in the world.
  • The revised first section of the book has been refocused on living religions in the Americas and Africa.
  • The account of the origins of Hinduism in Chapter 4 has been updated to reflect more recent scholarship.
  • Chapter 13 on Baha’i, previously available online only, is now included in the main text.
  • Primary source writings and sacred texts that help define each major world religion are included at the end of each chapter, offering students first-hand exposure to key readings from each faith. Shorter quotations from these works are included in text boxes throughout the body of the narrative.
  • Religion and Violence boxes throughout the text highlight the graphic nature of certain religious beliefs, both foreign and close to home. These features encourage students to review how religious violence can influence cultures around the world.
  • Religion and Public Life boxes throughout the text invite reflection on religion’s role in contemporary political and social issues.
  • Reconceived and expanded learning architecture throughout the text coordinates the main headings in the running text with both the learning objectives listed at the beginning of each chapter and the Think About It questions listed at the end of each chapter. This improved structure helps students understand what is expected of them in the course, and keeps them on task while they read.
  • Expanded lists of key terms at the beginning of each chapter better help students master the vocabulary of world religions.
Author biography
Lewis Moore Hopfe (1935—1992) graduated from Baylor University in 1956 with a B.A. in history and religious studies, an M. Div. degree from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in 1960, and his Ph.D. in Old Testament studies from Boston University in 1965. Dr. Hopfe began his teaching career in 1965 as an instructor in religious studies at Kendall College, Evanston, Illinois. During his early years of teaching it became apparent that there was a need for an introductory textbook for the study of world religions. He said, “Religion is never a simple subject, and can become complex and intricate to the complete dismay of the beginning student.” His goal was to provide the student with a reasonably brief and readable text that did not shortcut or simplify religions, but did not delve too deeply into the technicalities. Responding to this need the first edition of Religions of the World became a reality and was published in 1979. Dr. Hopfe was “an author, teacher, pastor, archaeologist, college dean, weight lifter, and spiritual guide to students, colleagues, and parishioners” whose lives he touched via the written and spoken word. Religions of the World is his legacy to academia.

Mark R. Woodward is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Arizona State University and Visiting Professor of Comparative Religions at the Center for Religious and Cross-cultural Studies at Gadjah Mada University in Indonesia. He received his Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology from the University of Illinois and also studied at the Divinity School at the University of Chicago. His research has focused on Islam, Buddhism, Christianity, and indigenous religions in Southeast Asia, especially Indonesia, Burma, and Singapore. For most of the past decade his research has centered on issues of religion, conflict, and violence in Southeast Asia and globally. He is the author, co-author, or editor of five books and many scholarly articles. He has taught the introductory level university course World Religions more than fifty times in the last twenty-five years.

Brett Hendrickson is an Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania, where he teaches courses on the religious history of the Americas, religion and healing, religion and public life, and the introductory course on world religions. He received his Ph.D. in Religious Studies from Arizona State University, a Master of Divinity (M.Div.) from Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, and an A.B. in Latin American Studies from Columbia University. Hendrickson’s research examines lived religious practices in Latin America and among Latinos and Latinas in the United States, with a special interest in religious and folk healing. His work attempts to explain religious interactions and exchanges among various ethnic and cultural groups in complex political and social contexts. He is the author of Border Medicine: A Transcultural History of Mexican American Curanderismo and several scholarly articles.